Autolus announces oral presentation at the AACR Annual Meeting of a Phase I study of a GD2 CAR-T cell Therapy in patients with neuroblastoma

Published 21 Mar 2018

Early signs of clinical activity for a GD2 CAR-T cell Therapy in a solid tumour setting

Autolus Limited, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing next-generation programmed T cell therapies for the treatment of cancer, today announced that a Phase I study of a glycosphingolipid GD2-targeting T cell therapy in paediatric patients with neuroblastoma has been accepted for an oral presentation at the AACR Annual Meeting. In the study, sponsored and managed by Cancer Research UK, preliminary signs of clinical activity have been observed. Autolus has worldwide commercial rights to the GD2 CAR T cell therapy under investigation, which was developed in Dr Martin Pule’s Laboratory, University College London.

Details of the oral presentation is as follows:
Title:
A Cancer Research UK phase I trial of anti-GD2 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)
Presenter: Dr K. Straathof
Session Date and Time: Tuesday Apr 17, 2018 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Location: N Hall C - McCormick Place North (Level 1)

Media Contact

JW Communications
Julia Wilson
+44 (0)7818 430877
juliawilsonuk@gmail.com

About Autolus

Autolus is a private, clinical-stage, biopharmaceutical company developing next-generation, programmed T cell therapies for the treatment of cancer. Using a broad suite of proprietary and modular T cell programming technologies, the company is engineering precisely targeted, controlled and highly active T cell therapies that are designed to better recognise cancer cells, break down their defence mechanisms and attack and kill these cells. Autolus has a pipeline of products in development for the treatment of both haematological malignancies and solid tumours. For further information, please visit the company’s website at: www.autolus.com

About UCL Business PLC

UCL Business PLC (UCLB) is a leading technology transfer company that supports and commercialises research and innovations arising from UCL, one of the UK’s top research-led universities. UCLB has a successful track record and a strong reputation for identifying and protecting promising new technologies and innovations from UCL academics. UCLB has a strong track record in commercialising medical technologies and provides technology transfer services to UCL’s associated hospitals; University College London Hospitals, Moorfields Eye Hospital, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and the Royal Free London Hospital. It invests directly in development projects to maximise the potential of the research and manages the commercialisation process of technologies from laboratory to market. For further information, please visit: www.uclb.com Twitter: @UCL_Business

About Cancer Research UK

  • Cancer Research UK is the world’s leading cancer charity dedicated to saving lives through research.
  • Cancer Research UK’s pioneering work into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer has helped save millions of lives.
  • Cancer Research UK receives no funding from the UK government for its life-saving research. Every step it makes towards beating cancer relies on vital donations from the public.
  • Cancer Research UK has been at the heart of the progress that has already seen survival in the UK double in the last 40 years.
  • Today, 2 in 4 people survive their cancer for at least 10 years. Cancer Research UK’s ambition is to accelerate progress so that by 2034, 3 in 4 people will survive their cancer for at least 10 years.
  • Cancer Research UK supports research into all aspects of cancer through the work of over 4,000 scientists, doctors and nurses.
  • Together with its partners and supporters, Cancer Research UK's vision is to bring forward the day when all cancers are cured.

For further information about Cancer Research UK's work or to find out how to support the charity, please call 0300 123 1022 or visit www.cancerresearchuk.org. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

About Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumour in children that occurs outside of the brain and makes up 8% of the total number of children’s cancers and can occur anywhere in the body. The site of origin is either in one of the two adrenal glands situated in the abdomen or in nerve tissue that runs alongside the spinal cord, in the neck, chest, abdomen or pelvis. The adrenal glands normally release hormones to maintain blood pressure and enable the body to respond to stress. In some cases, neuroblastoma can spread to tissues beyond the original site such as the bone marrow, bone, lymph nodes, liver, and skin. As with most cancers, the cause of neuroblastoma is not known. When the lesion is localised, it is generally curable. However, long-term survival for children with advanced disease older than 18 months of age is poor despite aggressive multimodal therapy.